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  1. #1
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    Angle gear collar replacement 2004 S60R

    Having searched for as much information as I could on AWD failure I concluded that the sleeve that mates the transmission output to the angle gear input shaft was probably worn, not surprising on a 120,000 mile AWD Volvo. VIDA dice unit couldn’t find any faults with the AOC so I want ahead an ordered a service kit (31256246) which hit my wallet to the tune of £122. This comprises of an improved sleeve with nitrate coating, two seals (9143911 and 9143885), o-ring (didn't use), lithium based grease for splines (1161748), and five replacement bolts for the angle gear.




    Other supplies I bought were 2 ltrs of gearbox oil – API CL-4 75W-90 (M66 transmission) and 1 ltr of transmission/angle gear oil – 1161648.

    You will need fresh gearbox oil because as you pull the driveshaft it will start to leak out. Plus, with all the activity surrounding the sleeve replacement metal fragments (angle grinding) and debris will enter the gearbox.

    Before I begin explaining the task in hand I would like to thank members on this forum and others online who have completed and documented this DIY – without it the main dealer would have had my business.

    Now for the fun part: let’s get the collar off.

    Pull R/H driveshaft:

    Up on home made ramps; loosen R/H wheel nuts and axle bolt.
    Jack up suspension, remove wheel and axle bolt.
    Move brake caliper and suspend out of way. Remove brake disk.
    Remove track rod end from hub carrier, remove the two strut-to-hub carrier bolts. This allows rotation of the hub carrier so the driveshaft will pull free of the hub. Be careful do not allow axle to flop around as this could cause damage to the outer CV joint.
    From under car, undo two bolts and remove the driveshaft support cap.
    An extra pair of hands is helpful now as the driveshaft is pulled from the transmission. The CV joints will need to be prevented from flopping around.
    Get ready to lie under the car for hours.

    Remove angle gear:

    Remove downpipe to gain better access to prop shaft. No need to remove full exhaust.
    Remove the head shielding above the downpipe-to-catback flange. When you do this you allow the prop shaft centre support to move freely – important for the next job.
    Remove the six bolts from the angle gear output/end cap on prop shaft. Pull free and rest on anti roll bar.
    Remove five angle gear/ transmission housing bolts. Start from the awkward top bolt which is out of sight.
    Pull angle gear off transmission – it doesn’t require much force – and remove. It weights about 12kgs

    Not disappointed, this is what I expected to find - the collar gear splines that mate to angle gear input shaft were completely worn. The splines on the angle gear input shaft were in good condition - replacement angle gear not required thankfully.











    This is the point were the job got difficult. The sleeve is bonded to the transmission with epoxy from the factory – pretty much designed in mind with it staying put. Angle grinder deployed and rough holes cut to allow the three legged puller to grab. Used a socket placed inside the sleeve for the puller to brace against.
    Remove the two seals – replacements are in service kit – they only get in the way.
    I drained the gearbox oil before removing the large of the seals (9143911).

    After pulling, hammering and levering on the sleeve for 5 hours resulted in zero movement.

    Started afresh the next morning with a few weapons at my disposal: heat (propane torch), hammer drill (from tool hire shop) and a determination to get this damm thing off. I was past the point of no return because the sleeve was that badly damaged.
    Another couple of hours spent in the routine of pull, heat and hammer produced nothing.
    I tried a new technique which wasn’t neighbourhood friendly (drill was so loud) but it worked to pop the sleeve off in less than 10 mins. Right, this is what I did: heated the sleeve and then attacked it with the hammer drill in short burst where the rough holes were cut. Spin the sleeve on the transmission and repeat.






    There wasn’t lots of room to position the drill because it’s very long and the sleeve doesn’t stick out far. I found the best method was to lie on my side and hammer up in a manner to force it off the transmission output shaft.
    Remove the remainder of the epoxy off transmission output shaft, then grease the splines supplied with the service kit. Grease the splines on the angle gear input shaft too.

    Before fitting the new sleeve clean the seal seats then replace the two seals, ensure they are inserted the correct way round (embossed part numbers face out).
    2003 S60R. RaceS60R 3" DP, RaceS60R intake, Re-map performance remap, FMIC, D5 oil cooler

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    Squirtydog (Tuesday 30th April 2013)

  3. #2
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    Back in an AWD....Oh the grip!
    Dangerous Dave's Avatar
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    Yes, not an easy job I know, at least you didn't have to replace the gearbox too LOL

    Well done that man!
    1996 Olive Green 850 AWD - Forged rods, VXR injectors, 19T, Ostrich 2.0, cold air con. Follow the project here
    1996 Nautic Blue 850 AWD - The daily, resisting the urge to modify

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    sizzlechest (Sunday 18th September 2011)

  5. #3
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    Cheers pal. It was coming off that gearbox come hell or high water. The nightmare situation would have been getting it dragged to the dealers. Not a job for the faint- hearted!
    2003 S60R. RaceS60R 3" DP, RaceS60R intake, Re-map performance remap, FMIC, D5 oil cooler

  6. #4
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    wow good work there I certainly wouldn't dare attempt anything like that!

    BSR stage 3, BSR Stainless Exhaust, Vibratechnics gearbox Mount, OZ 17" Superturismo Alloys, Bell FMIC, LED Side lights, LED interior Lights, Tinted Windows, Eibach Sports Springs, K&N Air Intake, 3" Sports Cat and Downpipe, Debadged, EST Strut Brace, EST Grille, Black Moose Stickers, Bilstein B8 Dampers, Fully Polybushed, CC3 all round, CF Wingmirrors
    Release the Monkey inside of you >>> Trunk Monkey

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    sizzlechest (Sunday 18th September 2011)

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    Not a job I was looking forward to doing! Having AWD was one of the reasons I bought this car so when I figured out it wasn't working it had to get done. I got off fairly lightly by spending £122 on the service kit and £30 in oil.
    2003 S60R. RaceS60R 3" DP, RaceS60R intake, Re-map performance remap, FMIC, D5 oil cooler

  9. #6
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    Yes, certainly cheap compared to, I'm guessing, several hundered at the dealer.
    1996 Olive Green 850 AWD - Forged rods, VXR injectors, 19T, Ostrich 2.0, cold air con. Follow the project here
    1996 Nautic Blue 850 AWD - The daily, resisting the urge to modify

  10. #7
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    This is what I like to see, something that the dealer would charge you a small fortune for but you managed to do it yourself at home for let's face it....not very much.

    Well done that man.
    http://www.airbrushartists.org/Gal72..._s_Gallery.asp

    Currently rocking Volvo's finest V70R 2WD Manual

    Previous cars:
    1996 855 T5 (Ex Police),1996 854 T5,1996 855 T5,1995 855 Black T-5R,1996 960,1997 855 R

  11. #8
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    I'm not sure on how many hours labour the dealer would charge for this job - 4 or 5? My fear was they'd pull the 'oh dear, angle gear is gone, £1200 please sir'.
    2003 S60R. RaceS60R 3" DP, RaceS60R intake, Re-map performance remap, FMIC, D5 oil cooler

  12. #9
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    From what I am hearing - you have saved an absolute minimum of £1000.

    GL420CDi - "monster truck with 7 seats" . S60 SE EUIV DIESEL - Commuting .
    Honda CBR1000 aka Fireblade - "mid life crisis"

  13. #10
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    good job this is the dreaded s60r problem that people avoid over money,well done
    1995 854 t5r

  14. #11
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    Yosser's Avatar
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    Seeing as this thread has been referred to elsewhere, I'll add my 2p..

    I recently bought an XC70 that turned out to have an awd failure.

    As suggested by the above, the hardest part of the entire procedure was removing the sleeved collar from the gearbox.

    What worked for me was cutting two slots in the collar (opposite each other) using a grinder, then I used a hydraulic puller (with about 10T max load capability) to pull the collar out. It came off slowly, but with not much effort - the puller did the hard work. I used no heat at all.

    I absolutely recommend adding on of these puller kits to your arsenal, worth every penny. Something like this.

    Doing it on a 2 post lift also helped immensely, but I suppose you could manage on the driveway with decent axle stands.

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    Dangerous Dave (Saturday 7th January 2012)

  16. #12
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    Yosser's Avatar
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    Also - I never messed with the exhaust downpipe, and I used the puller in a 2 legged configuration.

    Use the opportunity when you have the angle box off to replace the turbo oil return seal

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    Good write up there, excellent work. Mine has just gone (60k miles from an uprated one) so looks like I'll be having some fun very soon as I don't want to be destroying the input shaft on the Angle Gear.

    'The greatest British inventions were built by men with flat caps in sheds' - James May

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    Ive had one of those pullers in the back of the garage for years guess i may have a use for it one day

  19. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yosser View Post
    Seeing as this thread has been referred to elsewhere, I'll add my 2p..

    I recently bought an XC70 that turned out to have an awd failure.

    As suggested by the above, the hardest part of the entire procedure was removing the sleeved collar from the gearbox.

    What worked for me was cutting two slots in the collar (opposite each other) using a grinder, then I used a hydraulic puller (with about 10T max load capability) to pull the collar out. It came off slowly, but with not much effort - the puller did the hard work. I used no heat at all.

    I absolutely recommend adding on of these puller kits to your arsenal, worth every penny. Something like this.

    Doing it on a 2 post lift also helped immensely, but I suppose you could manage on the driveway with decent axle stands.
    Quote Originally Posted by Yosser View Post
    Also - I never messed with the exhaust downpipe, and I used the puller in a 2 legged configuration.

    Use the opportunity when you have the angle box off to replace the turbo oil return seal
    I did mine a few days ago (2004 S60R).

    A three legged bearing puller and three slots (120 degrees apart) is a better method in my opinion, as you have more stability and less chance of the puller going on the skew.

    I used very little heat, just a disposeable blow torch, gave it a quick blast for a few minutes - this may not have even had any affect on the final result, who knows.

    Also as you say, no need to mess with exhaust OR steering rack etc, nothing had to be removed apart from drive shaft and prop shaft.
    Sorry, nothing Swedish here...

  20. #16
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    I can't remember why I chose to use the puller in the two legged configuration rather than three, but I must have thought it gave better access or something. I made sure the slots in the collar were right the way through so the puller legs had a really good grip. That said, if there is room for three legs then that would be preferable.


 

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